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Home » Child/Adolescent Mental Health » Promoting Mental Health » Resilience » Caring and Support

Caring and Support

A healthy, nurturing relationship with a child creates a foundation of support and caring that will have positive effects on that child’s sense of trust and self-esteem throughout his or her life.

 

HOME STRATEGIES

1.  Build a trusting relationship with your child.

  • Express yourself honestly, clearly, and respectfully as you would like your child to express her or himself.
  • Keep your word—if you say you are going to do something, do it .

2. Demonstrate good listening skills.

  • Re-phrase and/or summarize what your child says in order to ensure mutual understanding.
  • Let your children know that you take their concerns seriously.
  • Model good listening skills in all of your social interactions.

3. Provide validation for your child’s thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

  • Help your child to feel supported by showing you understand their feelings.
           ◊  Adult to young child example: “I can see that you’re sad and mad because they didn’t invite you to play the game.  That would make me upset too.”
          ◊  Adult to adolescent example: “I think I understand how much getting your license means to you and it can be so hard to be patient.”

4. Demonstrate your love.

  • Expressing your care and love verbally is great—demonstrating your care and love through your behaviors is even better.  Spend time with your children.  Do things together that you both enjoy.
  • Make sure your child knows that you love them, even when they do something wrong.

 

SCHOOL STRATEGIES

1.  Build a trusting relationship with your students.

  • Express yourself honestly, clearly, and respectfully as you would like your students to express themselves.
  • Keep your word—if you say you are going to do something, do it .

2. Demonstrate good listening skills.

  • Re-phrase and/or summarize what your students say in order to ensure mutual understanding.
  • Let your students know that you take their concerns seriously.
  • Model good listening skills in all of your social interactions.

3. Provide validation for your students’ thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

  • Help your students to feel supported by showing you understand their feelings.
           ◊  Teacher to young child example: “I am sorry you cannot find Bear Bear.  I know that is the stuffed animal you like the best.”
          ◊  Teacher to adolescent example: “I am sorry you did not get the lead role.  I know you worked hard for it and you are upset.”